You do not have to be good.
You do not have to walk on your knees
for a hundred miles through the desert, repenting.
You only have to let the soft animal of your body
love what it loves.
Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
Meanwhile the world goes on.
Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
are moving across the landscapes,
over the prairies and the deep trees,
the mountains and the rivers.
Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
are heading home again.
Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
the world offers itself to your imagination,
calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting –
over and over announcing your place
in the family of things.
Mary Oliver (via observando)
If you are a dreamer come in
If you are a dreamer a wisher a liar
A hoper a pray-er a magic-bean-buyer
If youre a pretender com sit by my fire
For we have some flax golden tales to spin
Come in!
Come in!
Shel Silverstein (via observando)

1337tattoos:

Nikita Broslavski

beartreadway:

The Narrows at Zion NP

letsgoforahike:

Let’s Go For A Hike
 takehito miyatake tsuneaki hiramatsu spencer balck vincent brady  tsuneaki hiramatsu vincent brady spencer black  tsuneaki hiramatsu vincent brady  tsuneaki hiramatsu

ohhellokelsey:

nubbsgalore:

fireflies in timelapse, photos by (click pic) vincent bradytakehito miyataketsuneaki hiramatsu and spencer black

I was just thinking about these photos earlier. So magical.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

(via fuckyeahmelissafabello)

mypubliclands:

Known for its big trees, Oregon boasts one giant that stands high above the others: the Doerner Fir. Managed by the Bureau of Land Management in Oregon’s Coast Range, the mighty Doerner Fir is the world’s tallest Douglas fir – a towering 327 feet tall, 11.5 feet in diameter, and over 450 years old. 

Winding roads take travelers through some of the most valuable forests in the nation to the Doerner Fir Trail, 50 miles from Coos Bay in Oregon’s Coast Range mountains. Check out a short film about the Doerner Fir on BLM Oregon/Washington’s YouTube channel

(via rushfuq)

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

(via errer)